The Secret History of Art
Noah Charney on Art Crimes and Art Historical Mysteries

The Secret History of Art – Noah Charney on Art Crimes and Art Historical Mysteries

Hunting Hitler’s Stolen Treasures: the Monuments Men” on Nat Geo

“Hunting Hitler’s Stolen Treasures: the Monuments Men,” the documentary tie-in to the Monuments Men movie that I host, will be screened on National Geographic Channel at 8pm EST on February 5.  Tune in if you get a chance.

Interview with James Patterson, the World’s Best-Selling Author

My interview this week is with the best-selling living author–in the world right now, the great and often elusive James Patterson.  I’ll have what he’s having…

The Fate of the Masterpiece: How the Monuments Men Rescued the Mystic Lamb from the Nazis

Dear Friends, a new eBook Single edition of my best-selling STEALING THE MYSTIC LAMB has just been released by PublicAffairs: The Fate of the Masterpiece: How the Monuments Men Rescued the Mystic Lamb from the Nazis.

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Is Sherlock Holmes a Good Detective?

In the Arthur Conan Doyle story, “The Silver Blaze,” Sherlock Holmes discusses the theft of a race horse from a country estate that is guarded by a fierce watch dog.

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Amy Tan Interview

Don’t miss The Secret History of Art’s exclusive interview with author Amy Tan, featured in a recent How I Write column in The Daily Beast.

Michael Connelly Interview: On Iced Tea and Blackout Shades

Check out The Secret History of Art’s interview with Michael Connelly, called the greatest living crime writer, for the How I Write series in The Daily Beast.

Back from the Holidays

The Secret History of Art is back after the holidays.  I just counted and I wrote 66 articles last year, 62 of which have been published, and that excludes my 52 weekly How I Write interviews. Plus books. This being a writer stuff is a full-time job…
Most of the articles are available here:http://noahcharney.smugmug.com/Essays/Articles

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Hitler’s Holy Grail and the Hunt for the Ghent Altarpiece

This was a busy week for The Secret History of Art.  Saturday night screened a BBC2 documentary that I helped to produce and appeared in (“The World’s Most Expensive Stolen Paintings“).  Friday I had a feature in The Guardian about the 1934 theft of the Judges panel from The Ghent Altarpiece.  Saturday I had a feature in The Daily Beast that touched upon the Judges panel, but was really about the Nazi Ahnenerbe, their paranormal research division.  And last week I had a feature on CNN about the 100th anniversary of the return of the Mona Lisa.  In case you missed any, all the links are here.

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BBC Art Theft Documentary

Saturday the 21st at 9pm UK time, on BBC2, you can catch a documentary film on art theft which both features me as a guest expert, and which I helped put together.  Produced by IWC, it is a showcase of friends and colleagues of ARCA (Association for Research into Crimes against Art).  I appear in Ghent speaking about the theft of the Judges panel from the Ghent Altarpiece, and I’m also the “art and criminology consultant” on the program.  You’ll also see Dick Drent (head of security for the Van Gogh Museum), Dick Ellis (former head of Scotland Yard’s Arts Squad), General Giovanni Pastore (former head of the Carabinieri’s Art Squad), Anthony Amore (security director of the Gardner Museum)–all ARCA trustees and friends, as well as other colleagues.  The documentary is very well done and I highly recommend it, if you are either in the UK or you can trick your computer into thinking that you are in the UK (in which case you can watch it live using BBC Player).  Happy viewing and happy holidays!

As Little as 1.5% of Stolen Art Recovered and Prosecuted

In this month’s print edition of The Art Newspaper, you’ll find a feature on art theft and ARCA, inspired by ARCA’s symposium, held this November at the V&A Museum.  The article mentions the dramatic rate of recovery for stolen art (usually estimated at around 2-6% of reported stolen art is recovered), and as little as 1.5% (according to a study by Mark Durney) is both recovered and the criminals successfully prosecuted.  Check out the article in the print December edition.

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