Movie Journal
J. Hoberman on movies and movie-related things

MOVIE JOURNAL: J. Hoberman on movies and movie-related things

Archive for the ‘Foreign Film’ Category

Stuff for the Buff

Only hours left to shop. Herewith a few items for the serious cinephile that said sc is unlikely to yet have:

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Time is the Essence in “Cousin Jules”

A documentary classic that slipped through the cracks, the late Dominique Benicheti’s 1973 Locarno prize winner “Cousin Jules” gets its belated US theatrical premiere
 at Film Forum in a new 2K digital restoration.

Read the full article here.

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“Narco Cultura”: Day of the Dead 4 Ever

Musicians brandishing bazookas on stage, cops masked like El Santo, a posh Sinaloa necropolis in which the tombs have bullet proof glass, mutilated corpses in the streets of Ciudad Juárez: Mexican photographer Shaul Schwarz’s “Narco Cultura” is the most scarific doc I’ve seen since “The Act of Killing.”

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Agnieszka Holland: “A Woman Alone”

Contemplating Agnieszka Holland’s career I get the sense of a slugger who won’t quit or powerful swimmer heading resolutely upstream.

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Miyazaki’s “Wind Rises” Briefly

With one-week Oscar qualifying runs in New York and Los Angeles, anime master Hayao Miyazaki’s “The Wind Rises” is getting an extremely careful roll-out from distributor Walt Disney—as well it might. The animated feature that the 72-year-old Miyazaki has said will be his last, is a fanciful bio-pic of the aeronautical engineer Jiro Horikoshi, introduced as a boy who dreams of designing airplanes that somehow become Japan’s most feared World War II weapon, the Mitsubishi Zero fighter.

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“Golden Slumbers”: Ghost of Cinema Past

An exotic and elegant meta movie, “Golden Slumbers” shores the fragments of a ruined cinema—namely the 400 or so films made in Cambodia between 1960, when an indigenous movie industry was inspired by king and sometime filmmaker Norodom Sihanouk, and 1975, when that industry was destroyed in the Khmer Rouge bloodbath that murdered over a million people.

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Kechiche’s Cannes-Winning “Blue” Movie

One is the loneliest number in “Blue is the Warmest Color,” Adellatif Kechiche’s inflated but not inconsequential lesbian love story. The French-Tunisian filmmaker’s fifth feature caused a sensation last May at Cannes. The conclusion of the long, explicit sex scene that is the movie’s set piece was reportedly greeted with applause at its press screening and received maximum ink in the ensuing coverage. The jury headed by Steven Spielberg gave “Blue” the Palme d’Or with a special ooh-la-la twist, honoring a threesome with the movie’s intrepid co-stars Léa Seydoux and Adèle Exarchopoulos laureled as equal creators alongside its writer-director.

Read the full article here.

Image: IFC Films

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Broken China: Jia Zhangke’s “Touch of Sin”

Titled and opening like a spaghetti western, Jia Zhangke’s new movie opens with a tomato-ladden truck toppled to block a two-lane highway. Three young toughs waylay a passing motorcyclist. He takes out a gun and mows them down. Something explodes: “A Touch of Sin”.

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NYFF: The Fourth Marathon

The 51st New York Film Festival opens Friday night with the yet to preview action flick “Captain Phillips”; it yesterday press screened the fourth of its four-hour marathons, Agnieszka Holland’s “Burning Bush.”

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NY Film Fest Builds Strong Kidneys Four Ways

Great cinema may require great fortitude. “Welcome to the no potty breaks film festival,” Lincoln Center Film Society publicist John Wildman joked, introducing the morning press screening of Filipino filmmaker Lav Diaz’s 250-minute riff on “Crime and Punishment,” “Norte, the End of History.”

Read the full article here.

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