Tyler Green
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The Modern Art Notes Podcast: Barbara Kruger

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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Barbara Kruger, whose most recent commission, Belief + Doubt, is on view at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. (The work officially opens to the public on August 20, but it is visible now.)

Kruger was the subject of an Ann Goldstein-curated 1999 retrospective at MOCA, an exhibition that traveled to the Whitney Museum of American Art. Her installation at — and actually on — the Italian Pavilion at the 2005 Venice Biennale helped her win the Biennale’s lifetime achievement award. The most recent major monograph on Kruger’s work was published in 2010 by Rizzoli.

Kruger and I discuss:

  • How and when she realized what ‘a Barbara Kruger’ was;
  • How much Kruger, who has made work the size of a matchbox cover and as big as the side of a warehouse, thinks about scale;
  • Why she made a work that addressed the American flag and American patriotism; and
  • Why she always uses sans serif fonts — and not serif fonts.

During the interview, I referenced this review of “September 11″ at MoMA’s PS1 outpost.

The second guest on the program is art historian and critic Karen Wilkin. Along with William Agee and Irving Sandler, Wilkin is the curator of “American Vanguards: Graham, Davis, Gorky, de Kooning and Their Circle, 1927-1942,” on view now at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. The exhibition presents the too-little-known Graham as the hub around which that generation of American modernists revolved.

To download the program directly, click here. To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can stream the program through the player below.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. It is released under this Creative Commons license. The program was edited by Wilson Butterworth. For images of the works discussed on this week’s show, click through to the jump.

Barbara Kruger, Belief + Doubt, 2012.

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Help!), Bus Shelter Project for the Public Art Fund, New York City, 1991.

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Questions), 1990-92. Installed on the MOCA Temporary Contemporary, Los Angeles.

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Questions), 1991.

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (I shop therefore I am), 1987.

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (We don’t need another hero), 1987.

John Graham, Embrace, 1932. Collection of The Phillips Collection, Washington.

David Smith, Untitled (Untitled [Head, Blue and White]), 1934.

Willem de Kooning, Pink Landscape, c. 1938.

Stuart Davis, Egg Beater No. 2, 1928. Collection of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Tex.

John Graham, Poussin m’instruit, 1944.

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Comments

  1. [...] Green interviews the sloganeering Barbara Kruger on the Modern Art Notes [...]

  2. [...] iTunes here. Download the program directly here. Subscribe to the RSS feed here. See images of artworks discussed on the show. « The Modern Art Notes Podcast: Barbara Kruger Blog Home [...]

  3. Untiled Questions…..your flag. Much more than here, your flag can be more esthetic instead of looking like a piece belonging on a commercial billboard…. of course we want that commercial…to fine art bridge that Warhol began ….but try to stretch yourself more to do it more aestheticaly and beautifully. for example keep your questions in the striped…or even redesign the stripes and stars…..recognition does not have to be boring……..I appreciate your work …but I need more ..

  4. check out Corrita King…..American artist who used slogans like ………”things go better with Peace On Earth” as compared to }Things go better with Coke”

  5. [...] program directly here. Subscribe via iTunes here. Subscribe to the RSS feed here. See images of artworks discussed on the show. « The Modern Art Notes Podcast: Josiah McElheny Blog Home [...]

  6. [...] You can listen to an interview with Barbara Kruger about her artistic practice from The Modern Art N…. [...]

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