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The Modern Art Notes Podcast: Mark Handforth

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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Mark Handforth, whose work is on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami in the survey exhibition, “Mark Handforth: Rolling Stop.” The exhibition is on view through Feb. 19 and is accompanied by a handsome catalogue. (The catalogue Q&A between Handforth and Tom Eccles, the executive director of the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, is particularly good. I can’t find a way to link to the catalogue via Amazon or anywhere else, alas.)

Handforth’s work has been exhibited all over the world, including this past summer at the MCA Chicago and before that at the Hirshhorn, the Whitney, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer, in New York’s Central Park and in France, Norway, Ireland and Switzerland. A Brit who came to the United States and immediately found himself awed by our urban and freeway infrastructures, his work is big, often funny, and is thoroughly informed by an outsider’s experience of America. After talking with him for this week’s show, I came to think of him as something of a de Tocqueville with power tools.

To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can stream the program through the player below.

Handforth and I discuss:

  • His children’s reaction to his work;
  • How his experience of European cities left him somewhat unprepared for urban America and how that surfaces in his work;
  • His fascination with the strange messages on American freeway signs;
  • How he once thought Miami and Los Angeles were more or less the same place;
  • How he came to work with streetlights; and
  • Why he wanted to light up a tree in a Miami-area city park.

In the show’s second segment, LACMA curator Sofía Sanabrais and I discuss the seemingly unlikely story of how exactly Japanese screen painting came to influence Mexican painters during the Spanish colonial period. Sanabrais wrote her PhD dissertation on the subject and contributed to “Contested Visions in the Spanish Colonial World,” a recent LACMA exhibition. It opens at the Museo Nacional de Historia in Mexico City this summer.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. It is released under this Creative Commons license. For images of the works discussed on this week’s program, click through to the jump.

Mark Handforth, Electric Tree, 1998-2011.

Carl Andre, Equivalent VIII, 1966. Collection of the Tate.

Mark Handforth, Lamppost, 2003.

Mark Handforth, Dallas Snake, 2007.

Mark Handforth, installation view of Lamppost Snake, 2011; Slow, 2005, collection of the Dallas Museum of Art, and Blue Hangar, 2011 at the Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami.

Mark Handforth, installation view of Lamppost Snake, 2011 at the MCA Chicago.

Mark Handforth, Rolling Stop, 2008.

Mark Handforth, installation view, The Modern Institute, Glasgow, Scotland.

Richard Diebenkorn, Spreading Spade from the series “Clubs and Spades,” 1981. Collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Mark Handforth, No Exit, 2004.

Mark Handforth, Texas Tom, 2007.

Mark Handforth, Wishbone, 2007.

Folding Screen with the Conquest of Mexico (front); View of the City of Mexico (back), Mexico, late 17th century, collection of Vera Da Costa Autrey, Mexico

Folding Screen with the Four Continents, Mexico, late 17th century, Museo de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.

Night Festival of Tsushima Shrine, Japan, early Edo period, Kan’ei era, 1624–44. Collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

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Comments

  1. [...] Green’s MAN podcast with sculptor Mark Handforth is well worth a listen. (At 50+ minutes a whole pot of tea or coffee might be [...]

  2. [...] During this week’s show, Handforth and I talked about how much the details related to Lamppost mattered to Handforth, right down to how the piece had to be plugged into the city electrical grid, so that the lights on the lamp would come on at the same time the rest of the city’s lights did. (To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here.To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. To stream the show or to see images discussed on the program, click here.) [...]

  3. [...] This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features trickster-sculptor Tom Friedman, whose first New York show in six years is on view at Luhring Augustine. Friedman will also be featured in “Lifelike,” which opens at the Walker Art Center later this month. In the second segment, Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts curator Francesca Herndon-Consagra joins me to discuss her exhibition “Reflections of the Buddha” — and how Buddhism informed Pulitzer architect Tadao Ando’s work. To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. To stream the show or to see images discussed on the program, click here. « Friday exhib: “Multiplicity” at SAAM Blog Home Weekend roundup Tweet window.fbAsyncInit = function() { FB.init({appId: 'your app id', status: true, cookie: true, xfbml: true}); }; (function() { var e = document.createElement('script'); e.async = true; e.src = document.location.protocol + '//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js'; document.getElementById('fb-root').appendChild(e); }()); [...]

  4. [...] The field of the year?: While Picasso shows are the new Impressionism shows and while grad students continue to flock toward contemporary art at a rate that defies all necessity, the most interesting art historical field of the moment may be colonial Spanish art. Museums from Brooklyn to Los Angeles are eagerly snapping up fine examples for their collections and LACMA in particular has established itself as a leader in the field. Nowhere moreso than in the superb late-2011 catalogue “Contested Visions in the Spanish Colonial World,” which was edited by Ilona Katzew. (Amazon: $44. MAN Podcast.) [...]

  5. [...] to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. To see images of artworks discussed on the show, visit Modern Art [...]

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