Fashioning Art: Marc Jacobs and Yayoi Kusama

Marc Jacobs Spring 2015 and Love is Calling (2013), Yayoi Kusama [Image taken from Fash of the Titans

Marc by Marc Jacobs Spring 2015 and Love is Calling (2013), Yayoi Kusama [Image taken from Fash of the Titans

Love is Calling was unveiled during the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusam’a inaugural solo exhibition, I Who Have Arrived in Heaven, with David Zwirner Gallery in 2013, after leaving Gagosian Gallery in January that year at the end of a five-year partnership. The exhibition title hints at the Kusama’s life long fascination with higher cosmic realms and the autobiographical nature of her body of work. Love is Calling continues the artist’s characteristic investigation into form and space. In the psychedelic infinity room, soft tentacle shapes grow from the mirror-panelled floors and ceilings. The viewer is immersed in a phantasmagorical, kaleidoscopic experience as the inflatable tentacles covered in Kusama’s trademark polka dots gradually change colour, emanating a technicolour glow. A voice recording of the artist reading a love poem in Japanese accompanies them as the viewer moves through the glittering landscape.

Marc by Marc Jacobs show [Image taken from The Huffington Post

Marc by Marc Jacobs show [Image taken from The Huffington Post]

For their 2015 Spring collection, Luella Bartley and Katie Hillier, then the heads of the now defunct Marc by Marc Jacobs, presented a heady collection inspired by British rave culture. Working with House of Harlot, the latex couturiers from London’s East End, Bartley and Hillier fashioned latex into polka-dot skirts, capelets and tights, presented with hair twisted into glossy top knots and Chelsea boots dipped in rubber with creamy pastel hues. Walking down a runway ablaze with strobe lighting to a heavy drum-‘n-bass soundtrack by Steve Mackey, Bartley and Hillier’s models looked straight out of Camden’s Cyberdog crew, the original pioneers of fluoro fashion. In the main look above, semi-sheer, zig-zagging alice blue latex panels with different sized polka dots recall Kusama’s inflatable tentacles. The slick, wet-look latex tights evoke the inky black mirrored panels of Kusama’s infinity room.

Main image taken from Fash of the Titans.

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FROM BLOUIN ARTINFO