In the Air
Art News & Gossip

In the Air – Art+Auction's Gossip Column

Outsider Art Fair Announces 2015 Exhibitor List

From January 29 to February 1, 2015, Outsider Art Fair will host its New York edition (the last at Center548 before the building is sold), featuring over 40 galleries spanning seven countries — from Haiti’s Galerie Bourbon-Lally to Japan’s Yukiko Koide Presents. In addition, a special exhibition titled “If I Had Possession over Judgment Day,” curated by Jay Gorney and Anne Doran, will showcase the work of Melvin Way, Emery Blagdon, Adolf Wölfli, Mark Lombardi, and the Philadelphia Wireman, uniting these artists from disparate eras and methods under themes of paranoia and controlling chaos. Check out the list — and a few preview images from the special exhibition — below.

Continue Reading

Check Out Works from ICI’s Auction: Abramović, Baldessari

Bidding begins at noon today for this year’s Independent Curators International (ICI) benefit auction, hosted on Artsy. Featuring works by Marina Abramović, Steve McQueen, Tara Donovan, John Baldessari, Trevor Paglen, and more, the live and silent auction will take place next Monday, November 17, during ICI’s benefit event at the Cunard Building. Also that evening, collector and nonprofit founder Dimitris Daskalopoulos will receive the 2014 Leo Award and curator Eva Barois De Caevel will receive the 2014 Independent Vision Curatorial Award, selected by Guggenheim deputy director and chief curator Nancy Spector. Meanwhile, check out a selection of the works up for bid, below.

Continue Reading

Tim Burton’s “Big Eyes” Leads ABMB’s Film Program

Art Basel in Miami Beach has announced its film program for this year’s fair, featuring a selection of over 80 works curated by David Gryn, including animation by Atsushi Kaga, dance-based work by Rashaad Newsome, a new cut of Parker Ito’s “Wipeout XL,” and a tribute to the late Harun Farocki. Plus, for this year’s feature, longtime Art Basel collaborator This Brunner has arranged an advance screening of Tim Burton’s “Big Eyes,” the story of painter Margaret Keane, set to hit theaters later in December. A new screening room will also be available in the Miami Beach Convention Center, allowing fairgoers to access even more works. Check out the complete list of films, below.
Continue Reading

Lord Jacob Rothschild Receives Second Annual Getty Medal

Lord Jacob Rothschild was awarded the second annual Getty Medal on Sunday, in a ceremony with opening remarks by Gwenyth Paltrow and J. Paul Getty Trust President and CEO James Cuno. In his acceptance speech, Rothschild emphasized the present connection between his family and the museum: “If you were to look in the index of the catalogue of the Getty’s decorative arts collection you would find no less than thirty-eight Rothschilds from whom the Getty has made acquisitions,” he said. Rothschild is also a recipient of the Queen’s Order of Merit; has acted as chairman of London’s National Gallery of Art and the Pritzker Prize for Architecture, and has sat on the board of the State Hermitage Museum of St. Petersburg and the Qatar Museums authority, among others.

Continue Reading

Were You Born On December 13, 1984?

To celebrate their 30th anniversary, Postmasters Gallery — launched “on a murky Saturday, December 13, 1984 in the heart of East Village,” and now located in Tribeca — is seeking a working New York City artist also born on the same day. The gallery wants to celebrate their three decades in operation, but doesn’t want to get too self-congratulatory about it, and so is planning on having a sort of vicarious birthday extravaganza in honor of a creative human being who is also turning 30 on that date. (They promise “Cake, presents, food & drink, music, surprises, the works.”) If you fit the bill, or know someone who does, contact the gallery (postmasters@thing.net) and let ‘em know. Meanwhile, Postmasters is showcasing Anton Perich’s “Electric Paintings” through November 22, and you can read a bit more about Daria Irincheeva here, whose solo show at the gallery was one of the highlight’s of the early fall season.

Continue Reading

Oasis Painting Stolen from U.K. Gallery by 50-Year-Old Man

Those of us passionate about 90s Britpop know all too well the “Blur vs. Oasis” debate, and especially how unflinchingly diehard its participants tend to get. Recently, however, one Oasis enthusiast took that devotion to criminal heights: Last week, a black-and-white rendering of the band by Russian artist Olga Tsarevska Loma was stolen from off the walls of Manchester’s MASA-UK gallery. Given that MASA-UK is relatively small and Loma’s paintings little-known, it was worth betting that the thief’s motives weren’t so much financial as they were musical. Or, as the BBC reported: “Referencing Oasis songs, PC Katherine Gosling said she was not aware of a ‘master plan’ behind the theft and that ‘some might say’ a fan was responsible,” thus cementing PC Katherine Gosling as a frontrunner in our list of all-time favorite humans. Today, however, the painting was found and the culprit apprehended — identified for now simply as “a 50-year-old man.” So as we head into the weekend, let’s all do so with the strangely heartwarming knowledge that obsessive fandom comes in all walks of life (and perhaps a slight curiosity as to where Blur frontman Damon Albarn’s equally fervent admirers might be). Meanwhile, here’s hoping Gosling & Co. are busy celebrating with a champagne supernova.

Continue Reading

Instagrams of the Art World: Performa’s Gala, Tilda Swinton, Mykki Blanco, and More

Takashi Murakami (takashipom) has been posting in-progress photos for his show at Gagosian all week — but our favorite has got to be this grump-faced reminder, presumably to studio assistants.

Continue Reading

A Comprehensive Guide to Crying at Art Exhibitions

We’ve all been there: Much like Stendhal in Florence, intrepid art viewers have probably come across an artwork or two that moved us, perhaps even to tears, perhaps even in public. So, in an effort to address this phenomenon of museum waterworks, the Independent published an article titled “From Millet’s ‘The Angelus’ to Rothko, why do some works of art make us cry?” For starters, author Philip Hook asserts that “People weep at concerts when listening to transcendent music; people weep watching films or reading sad books; but fewer tears are shed in front of works of visual art” — a thesis tested, we can only assume, by a series of field experts running control groups at each venue type, collecting specimens of the emitted eye-saline, and analyzing them for relative quotients of Sad. (The verdict? Rothkos. Everyone is just losing it over Rothkos.) Still, despite the case Hook ultimately makes for an upswing in art-related crying, and the increasing acceptance of such outward emotional expression overall, he also adds that “there remain some standards as far as art is concerned.” To sum up, he drops the all-important question: “Which artists’ work is it OK to be seen crying in front of, and which not?”

Continue Reading

Hairy Job Opportunities With Melgaard’s Studio

Hey kids! Are you underemployed and adventurous? Well then Bjarne Melgaard’s studio has a job just for you! The dapper, disturbing Norwegian — a professional rocker of crazy tracksuits and Instagrammer of torture-porn imagery who also moonlights as an artist — is seeking an unpaid intern to “create large hair based sculpture and paintings” in collaboration with hairstylist Bob Racine. And while this gig doesn’t offer any cash, Melgaard is dangling a rather attractive carrot before your uncompensated face: “Interns may receive a drawing by Bjarne Melgaard at the end of the project, provided the work was satisfactory” [emphasis added]. Who said the life of a recent art-school grad wasn’t glamorous?

Continue Reading

Dig In to Sorry Archive’s Archaeological Exhibition

For those looking to realize some long-quashed archaeology dreams, or just aching to literalize some metaphors, you should probably swing by Maspeth’s Knockdown Center tomorrow night for the opening of Sorry Archive’s “And The Villagers Never Liked You Anyway.” Predicated on the idea that “exhibitions are historical sites,” according to its press release, the show consists of a 10-by-10-foot dirt plot, divided into 10 sections, each of which boasts a different curator — including Brooklyn’s SIGNAL and 99¢ Plus galleries. Though the set-up alone is enough to pique our interest and then some, the further details remain a bit difficult to glean — behold the following description and excavate what meaning you can:

Continue Reading